12 Best Hand Sewing Needles Uk

Updated on: August 2021

Best Hand Sewing Needles Uk in 2021


Pony Size 18 - 22 Chenille Gold Eye Hand Sewing Needles by Pony

Pony Size 18 - 22 Chenille Gold Eye Hand Sewing Needles by Pony
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

Big Eye Quilting Hand Needles-Size 10 12/Pkg

Big Eye Quilting Hand Needles-Size 10 12/Pkg
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • Finest Quality English Needles
  • These are a great way to add extra design to whatever project you want to add it to
  • The perfect start to any project

PONY P10081 Coloured Eye Tapestry Hand Sewing Needles 24 in Compact Sizes 22-28

PONY P10081 Coloured Eye Tapestry Hand Sewing Needles 24 in Compact Sizes 22-28
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • fine tapestry needle
  • extra long eye
  • blunt point
  • colour coded eyes
  • sizes 22 24 26 28

Parodi&Parodi Product Code 690 Needle Threader, Automatic Needle Threader for Sewing Machines, Portable and Lightweight, Can Be Used for Both Thick and Fine Needles, Patented, Made in Italy

Parodi&Parodi Product Code 690 Needle Threader, Automatic Needle Threader for Sewing Machines, Portable and Lightweight, Can Be Used for Both Thick and Fine Needles, Patented, Made in Italy
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • For both thick and fine needles.
  • Automatic.
  • Various assorted colours.
  • Easy to use.

Bohin Bead/Applique Needles, Size 10, 15 Per Package

Bohin Bead/Applique Needles, Size 10, 15 Per Package
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Bohin-Bead applique needles
  • These are fantastic needles to have while working on any sewing projects! they work well with all of your beading projects
  • This package contains fifteen size 10 metal needles

PRYM 121295 Hand sewing needles sharps with gold eye No. 5–9 assorted, 20 pieces

PRYM 121295 Hand sewing needles sharps with gold eye No. 5–9 assorted, 20 pieces
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Array

Pony P10181 Coloured Eye Chenille Hand Sewing Needles 24 in Compact Sizes 20-26

Pony P10181 Coloured Eye Chenille Hand Sewing Needles 24 in Compact Sizes 20-26
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • fine chenille needle
  • extra long eye
  • very sharp point
  • colour coded eyes
  • sizes 20 22 24 26

Bohin Betweens Hand Needles, Size 9, 20 Per Package

Bohin Betweens Hand Needles, Size 9, 20 Per Package
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Bohin-Between hand needles
  • These are fantastic needles to have while working on patchwork and quilting projects! they work well with ordinary sewing for thick material
  • This package contains twenty size 9 metal needles

PRYM 121289 Hand sewing needles sharps with gold eye No. 5; 40 x 0.80 mm, 20 pieces

PRYM 121289 Hand sewing needles sharps with gold eye No. 5; 40 x 0.80 mm, 20 pieces
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • Array

Darice Beading Hand Needles-Size 15 4/Pkg

Darice Beading Hand Needles-Size 15 4/Pkg
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • Array

Pony Size 10-12 Beading Gold Eye Sewing Needles

Pony Size 10-12 Beading Gold Eye Sewing Needles
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2021
  • Excellent quality.
  • Easy to use.
  • All pony sewing needles have an anti-tarnish 'gold eye' which is exceptionally smooth and easy to thread.
  • Very fine, with a narrow eye to enable them to fit through the centre of beads and sequins.
  • Long shaft to hold a number of beads at a time.

Bohin Milliners Hand Needles, Size 10, 15 Per Package

Bohin Milliners Hand Needles, Size 10, 15 Per Package
BESTSELLER NO. 12 in 2021
  • Bohin-Milliners hand needles
  • These are fantastic needles to have while working on any sewing projects! they work well with basting gathering and over sewing
  • This package contains fifteen size 10 metal needles

Essential Hand Sewing Stitches

Knowing how to sew a few simple stitches by hand is essential, even when you have a sewing machine, to make curtains, cushions or other fabric accessories.

These are some of the most useful stitches you will need to complete the majority of soft furnishing projects. When you are unfamiliar with a stitch, try it out first on scraps of fabric before putting it into practice on the item you are sewing. When practicing, use a contrasting sewing thread so you can see the stitch formation clearly.

It is important to catch the sewing thread securely with a small backstitch at the beginning and end of a row of permanent hand stitching.

At the start, bring the needle and thread through all layers of fabric from the back, leaving a short end of thread behind. Take a small stitch backwards and bring the needle up again just behind the emerging thread.

Continue in the chosen stitch to the end of the row and finish off with another backstitch.

Temporary stitches (such as tacking), that are removed after machine stitching, are anchored at the beginning of a row with a knot tied in the end of the thread.

Tacking:

This temporary stitch is used to mark a stitching line or the hold two or more layers of fabric together until they are machined permanently. Use a contrasting colored thread so that you can see the stitches easily when removing them.

Start with a knot at the end of the thread. Work from right to left, passing the needle in and out through the fabric layers. Make longish, evenly spaced stitches. For speed, take several stitches on to the needle together before pulling the thread through or space the stitches further apart.

Diagonal tacking:

This stitch holds two layers of fabric firmly together. It is used to secure linings, interlinings and wadding to the main fabric during final stitching. Once the layers are stitched together, the tacking stitches are removed.

Knot the end of the thread and make a long horizontal stitch from right to left through the fabric and lining. Working down the fabric, insert the needle again from right to left, 1 ½ inches (4cm) immediately below the previous stitch. Repeat down the whole length of the fabric, creating a row of parallel diagonal stitches, which are removed after final stitching.

Ladder stitch:

This is a temporary stitch used to hold batched patterns at seam lines before machine stitching.

Press under the seam allowance on one piece of fabric. With right sides of the fabrics facing upwards, lay the folded edge on the seam line of the second piece so that the pattern matches.

Working from right to left, take a stitch through the upper fold of fabric. Insert the needle into the lower fabric near the seam and bring it out again 3/8 inch (1cm) along. Continue to alternate stitches, removing pins as you go. Open out the fold before stitching the seam along the tacking line. Then remove ladder stitches.

Running stitch:

Running stitch is like a small, neat tacking stitch. It is used mainly for gathering fabric to make frills and can be permanent or removed if the seam is machine stitched as well.

Working from right to left, anchor the thread with a small knot and weave the needle in and out of the fabric several times to make small, evenly spaced stitches before pulling the thread through. When gathering, sew a second, parallel row of stitches ¼ inch (6mm) below the first.

Backstitch:

This strong stitch is used for stitching and repairing seams by hand, particularly on small areas where machining would be awkward. On the reverse, the stitches overlap and are twice as long as on top.

Working from right to left, secure the thread, then take another short stitch backwards over the first, this time bringing the needle out to the front, a stitch length to the left of the first stitch. Take the needle back to the end of the previous stitch each time, to form a continuous row of neat, even stitches.

Slipstitch:

Slipstitch is used to join two folded edges together invisibly, such as along the opening on a cushion cover.

Place the two folded edges together, with right sides facing you. Anchor the thread in a fold. Take the needle across to the opposite edge and slip it ¼ inch (6mm) along the fold. Pull the thread to draw the edges together. Work from side to side until the opening is closed.

Overhand stitch:

This holds together two finished edges, such as attaching lace trim to a hem. It is firmer than slipstitch, but not as invisible.

Working from right to left, insert the needle diagonally through both edges, picking up a few threads in each. Pull through firmly then take the needle straight back across the join ready to do the next stitch.

Flat hemming:

This is an almost invisible hemming stitch used on light and medium weight fabrics.

Work from right to left, with the hem facing away from you. Secure sewing thread on hem using a double stitch. Pick up one or two threads on the single fabric, insert needle diagonally through the folded hem and pull sewing thread through lightly to avoid puckering.

Hemming slipstitch:

This delicate stitch is used to secure hems on lightweight and sheer fabrics.

Work from right to left, with the hem facing away from you. Anchor the sewing thread on the hem. Pick up a thread of the single fabric. Then insert the needle into the hem edge, and slip along the fold. Continue stitching in an even zigzag fashion along the hem.

Herringbone stitch:

Use this stitch to neaten or hem raw edges on medium and heavyweight fabrics of the secure interfacing.

Working from left to right with the hem facing you, secure the sewing thread in the hem edge. Pick up one or two threads in the fabric above the hem, and slightly to the right, with the needle pointing from right to left. Moving the needle the same distance to the right again, take the next stitch from right to left through the hem. Continue to alternate stitches, keeping them even.

Blanket stitch:

Traditionally an embroidery stitch, it is also used to neaten raw edges and as a decorative edging on non-fray fabrics like felt.

Working from left to right with the fabric edge towards you, bring the needle through from the wrong side at stitch height and anchor the working thread. Insert the needle back through the fabric from the right side and bring it straight out at right angles to the edge over the working thread. Continue inserting the needle from the front, moving a little way to the right each time with the thread running along the edge. Keep the stitch height and spacing even.

Lockstitch:

Lockstitch is used mainly in making curtains and bedspreads to link the fabric permanently to its lining.

Lay the fabric and lining flat on the floor with wrong sides facing. Pin together down the center and fold the lining back on itself along the line of pins.

Work the stitches from top to bottom. Anchor the thread on the lining. With the needle pointing from right to left at right angles to the fold, pick up one or two threads in the folded edge and then in the fabric. Leave a length of thread running down for about 4 inches (10cm), then pick up one or two threads in the lining and fabric again. Take the needle over the working thread, forming a loop. Continue down the length of the fold, keeping the stitches slightly loose.

On large curtains or bedspreads, lock the lining and fabric seams together, and work further rows of lockstitching at 16 inch (40cm) intervals.

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